Herald Reporter
Fifty people have been killed while 40 others were injured, some permanently, since January as human-wildlife conflicts continue to escalate.

This is a sharp rise in such cases compared to all of last year when 38 people were killed.

Elephants accounted for 50 percent of the killings followed by crocodiles at 40 percent, and lions and buffaloes at 10 percent respectively
Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority (ZimParks) spokesperson Mr Tinashe Farawo told The Herald last week that the spike in human-wildlife conflicts was worrying, adding they were caused by deepening water shortages and overpopulation resulting in the animals destroying their habitats and moving into areas where people live.

He predicted that such cases would worsen between now and November as water shortages deepen.

“The animals are not only a danger to humans, but their habitat as well. Apart from water shortages, there is over population, which can only be addressed by translocating the animals but the process requires a lot of money, which we do not have at the moment,” said Mr Farawo.

Last week, an elderly Hwange man was killed by an elephant while on his way to fetch cattle. Last month a mentally challenged man in Victoria Falls was trampled to death by an elephant.

Victoria Falls raised concern over the tragedy and implored the Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority (Zimparks) to deal with the problem.
The man used to walk on the streets of the resort town scavenging for food and was attacked by the elephant late in the afternoon as he walked near the National Railways of Zimbabwe train station.

He died on the spot in full view of passing residents.